Youngho Lee

Youngho Lee

Visiting Researcher
Youngho Lee received his BS in Dept. of Mathematics from Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejon, Korea, in 1999 and M.S. degree in the Dept. of Information and communication from Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Gwanju, Korea, in 2001. In 2008, he received his Ph.D. (Advisor: Prof. Woontack Woo) in School of Information & Mechatronics from Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST). He was a Post-doctoral research fellow and Research Assistant Professor at GIST CTI in 2008 and 2009 respectively. Since Sept. 2009, he has been with the Mokpo National University (MNU), where he is an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Engineering. From 2016 to 2018, he joined Empathic Computing Lab(Prof. Mark Billinghurst). at University of South Australia (UniSA). His research interests include Context-aware computing, HCI, virtual/augmented reality, and remote collaboration, etc.
Email:
youngho@ce.mokpo.ac.kr

Projects

  • Empathy Glasses

    We have been developing a remote collaboration system with Empathy Glasses, a head worn display designed to create a stronger feeling of empathy between remote collaborators. To do this, we combined a head- mounted see-through display with a facial expression recognition system, a heart rate sensor, and an eye tracker. The goal is to enable a remote person to see and hear from another person's perspective and to understand how they are feeling. In this way, the system shares non-verbal cues that could help increase empathy between remote collaborators.

Publications

  • Improving Collaboration in Augmented Video Conference using Mutually Shared Gaze
    Gun Lee, Seungwon Kim, Youngho Lee, Arindam Dey, Thammathip Piumsomboon, Mitchell Norman and Mark Billinghurst

    Gun Lee, Seungwon Kim, Youngho Lee, Arindam Dey, Thammathip Piumsomboon, Mitchell Norman and Mark Billinghurst. 2017. Improving Collaboration in Augmented Video Conference using Mutually Shared Gaze. In Proceedings of ICAT-EGVE 2017 - International Conference on Artificial Reality and Telexistence and Eurographics Symposium on Virtual Environments, pp. 197-204. http://dx.doi.org/10.2312/egve.20171359

    @inproceedings {egve.20171359,
    booktitle = {ICAT-EGVE 2017 - International Conference on Artificial Reality and Telexistence and Eurographics Symposium on Virtual Environments},
    editor = {Robert W. Lindeman and Gerd Bruder and Daisuke Iwai},
    title = {{Improving Collaboration in Augmented Video Conference using Mutually Shared Gaze}},
    author = {Lee, Gun A. and Kim, Seungwon and Lee, Youngho and Dey, Arindam and Piumsomboon, Thammathip and Norman, Mitchell and Billinghurst, Mark},
    year = {2017},
    publisher = {The Eurographics Association},
    ISSN = {1727-530X},
    ISBN = {978-3-03868-038-3},
    DOI = {10.2312/egve.20171359}
    }
    To improve remote collaboration in video conferencing systems, researchers have been investigating augmenting visual cues onto a shared live video stream. In such systems, a person wearing a head-mounted display (HMD) and camera can share her view of the surrounding real-world with a remote collaborator to receive assistance on a real-world task. While this concept of augmented video conferencing (AVC) has been actively investigated, there has been little research on how sharing gaze cues might affect the collaboration in video conferencing. This paper investigates how sharing gaze in both directions between a local worker and remote helper in an AVC system affects the collaboration and communication. Using a prototype AVC system that shares the eye gaze of both users, we conducted a user study that compares four conditions with different combinations of eye gaze sharing between the two users. The results showed that sharing each other’s gaze significantly improved collaboration and communication.
  • A Remote Collaboration System with Empathy Glasses

    Y. Lee, K. Masai, K. Kunze, M. Sugimoto and M. Billinghurst. 2016. A Remote Collaboration System with Empathy Glasses. 2016 IEEE International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality (ISMAR-Adjunct)(ISMARW), Merida, pp. 342-343. http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/ISMAR-Adjunct.2016.0112

    @INPROCEEDINGS{7836533,
    author = {Y. Lee and K. Masai and K. Kunze and M. Sugimoto and M. Billinghurst},
    booktitle = {2016 IEEE International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality (ISMAR-Adjunct)(ISMARW)},
    title = {A Remote Collaboration System with Empathy Glasses},
    year = {2017},
    volume = {00},
    number = {},
    pages = {342-343},
    keywords={Collaboration;Glass;Heart rate;Biomedical monitoring;Cameras;Hardware;Computers},
    doi = {10.1109/ISMAR-Adjunct.2016.0112},
    url = {doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/ISMAR-Adjunct.2016.0112},
    ISSN = {},
    month={Sept.}
    }
    In this paper, we describe a demonstration of remote collaboration system using Empathy glasses. Using our system, a local worker can share a view of their environment with a remote helper, as well as their gaze, facial expressions, and physiological signals. The remote user can send back visual cues via a see-through head mounted display to help them perform better on a real world task. The system also provides some indication of the remote users face expression using face tracking technology.