Nastaran Saffaryazdi

Nastaran Saffaryazdi

PhD Student

Nastaran is a PhD student in the Empathic Computing Laboratory, at the University of Auckland under Prof Mark Billinghurst supervision. She is working on emotional data collection and emotion recognition during the conversation using behavioural cues and physiological changes.

She got her master degree in Computer Architecture at Isfahan University of Technology in Iran in medical image processing. Before her PhD, she worked as a lecturer in some universities in Iran, and a software developer in a company which is the leading provider of banking software solutions in Iran.

 

Publications

  • Inter-brain connectivity: Comparisons between real and virtual environments using hyperscanning
    Amit Barde, Nastaran Saffaryazdi, P. Withana, N. Patel, Prasanth Sasikumar, Mark Billinghurst

    Barde, A., Saffaryazdi, N., Withana, P., Patel, N., Sasikumar, P., & Billinghurst, M. (2019, October). Inter-brain connectivity: Comparisons between real and virtual environments using hyperscanning. In 2019 IEEE International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality Adjunct (ISMAR-Adjunct) (pp. 338-339). IEEE.

    @inproceedings{barde2019inter,
    title={Inter-brain connectivity: Comparisons between real and virtual environments using hyperscanning},
    author={Barde, Amit and Saffaryazdi, Nastaran and Withana, Pawan and Patel, Nakul and Sasikumar, Prasanth and Billinghurst, Mark},
    booktitle={2019 IEEE International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality Adjunct (ISMAR-Adjunct)},
    pages={338--339},
    year={2019},
    organization={IEEE}
    }
    Inter-brain connectivity between pairs of people was explored during a finger tracking task in the real-world and in Virtual Reality (VR). This was facilitated by the use of a dual EEG set-up that allowed us to use hyperscanning to simultaneously record the neural activity of both participants. We found that similar levels of inter-brain synchrony can be elicited in the real-world and VR for the same task. This is the first time that hyperscanning has been used to compare brain activity for the same task performed in real and virtual environments.